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Questions for Doctors and Other Professionals

A PDF copy of the questions below is also available.

  1. At what age should my child start saying “real” words? When should I start to be concerned that my child is NOT saying “real” words?
  2. I see children the same age as my two-year old speaking in two-word phrases. My two year-old speaks in one-word phrases only. Is this typical?
  3. My child seems to be using one side of his/her body only. Is this typical?
  4. My child (who is under two years of age) uses only one hand to hold and pick up and play with toys? Is this typical for a child his/her age?
  5. My child (who is over four years of age) still uses both hands equally when he/she plays and/or picks objects and eats. Is this typical for his/her age?
  6. My (two, three, four, five, six year-old) will not eat unless I put the food in his/her mouth. Is this typical?
  7. My child seems to be more interested in parts of a toy than the toy itself. For example, instead of moving a car around, he/she just spins its wheels for long periods of time. Is this typical?
  8. My (two, three, four, five, six year-old) child seems to play with one toy and one toy only, over and over again. Is this typical?
  9. My child seems to be extremely bothered by certain things that do not seem to bother other children, like the sound of an ambulance or the feel of certain fabrics. Is this typical?
  10. My (three, four, five, six year-old) child does NOT pretend that an object is something else (i.e. engage in pretend play). For example, he/she never pretends that a comb is a spoon or that a block is a car. Other children do this, but my child does not. Is this typical?
  11. My (three, four, five, six year-old) child has never pretended, in play, that he/she is someone else. For example, my child has never pretended to be a superhero, a dog, a baby or a doll. Is this typical?
  12. My (three, four, five, six year-old) child seems to have difficulties talking about or expressing his/her emotions. For example, I rarely hear my child talk about being happy or cry when he/she is sad. Is this typical?
  13. My (three, four, five, six year-old) child seems to prefer to be alone most of the time, instead of playing with other children. Is this typical?
  14. My (two, three, four, five, six year-old) child used to say a few words when he/she was younger, but is no longer saying them now and has not learned any new ones. Is this typical?
  15. My (three, four, five, six year-old) child appears to be quite clumsy. He/she keeps running into things, even when I tell him/her to watch where he/she is going, Is this typical?
  16. Most (three, four, five, six year-old) children seem to know the difference between big and small, tall and short and far and near one and many, but my child does not. Is this typical?
  17. Most (four, five, six year-old) children draw simple shapes and my child does not. Is this typical?
  18. My (two, three, four, five, six year-old) child cannot play with the same toy or game for more than a minute. Is this typical?

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